(Photo reposted from Pen Compass)
(Photo reposted from Pen Compass)

Recapping the last day of the pen show is done with melancholy. The whole weekend has been so amazing, so epic, that its hard to say goodbye. Many people had to head home on Sunday and our group got smaller as the hours ticked by.  It kind of reminds me of the closing scene of Ocean’s 11, which probably makes me the little contortionist.

Now, to the true report.

The doors opened at 9am again for 3-day pass holders and at 10am for single day attendees. The show floor weren’t nearly as crowded as they were on Friday and Saturday but some hot items’ stock was starting to dwindle.

Pen testing with Thomas and Leigh
Pen testing with Thomas and Leigh

I had an appointment to get some nib work done by Mike Masuyama on Sunday morning. The kind enablers, Thomas Hall and Leigh Reyes, spent the better part of Saturday night letting me test drive every single nib in their pen cases to help give me some idea of what I might want to get done from micro needlepoints to italics. In the end, I decided to have two of the nibs on pens I purchased tuned rather than reground. Since it was my first time getting professional nib work, I wanted to see how he could make a good nib better before I started making serious alterations. Next year, I’ll come with a better plan.

At noon, I attended Deborah Basil’s Cursive Handwriting class which was a great history of handwriting class and a refresher on cursive writing. The class materials were from Michael Sull’s American Cursive Handwriting. Sull is best known for all this work with Spencerian script but the handwriting system he created is a good blend of other styles with a more sophisticated look than some of systems taught to children. It made it quite appropriate for adults looking to improve their writing. Deborah was awesome and the class had at least four lefties in it, not counting Deboarh, so it was great to be able to work with someone who understood our struggles.

Brian Anderson with his pocket overflow, Mike Masuyama working on my nibs and Deborah Basil teaching the cursive writing class.
Brian Anderson with his pocket overflow, Mike Masuyama working on my nibs and Deborah Basil teaching the cursive writing class.

Then there was last-minute shopping and a couple laments that “for the sake of my wallet, these vendors need to start packing up!”

By about 4pm, a few of us took over an empty table next to the Karas Kustoms booth and sampled a few bottles of ink and a couple new pens. Every time one of us pulled out a new pen, it gets passed around for inspection and testing by every person within a ten yard vicinity. And no one ever seems to mind. Its pride in their good purchase, their new nib or their ink choice and the thrill of sharing the experience with people who understand the excitement. Its really magical. And there’s as much enthusiasm around a good, everydy TWSBI as their is with a rare, ridiculously expensive Nakaya — and each pen is passed around with equal enthusiasm and gushing. If someone passed around a Pilot Varsity, we’d be jut as interested.

Then their were dinners and drinks and hugs and farewells as folks departed for their beds and early flights.

I’d like to thank everyone who backed the Kickstarter and made it possible for me to be a part of this amazing adventure. I will be eterntally grateful to each and everyone of you. I will cherish the memories and friendships I made and look forward to sharing each of my purchases in reviews in the coming weeks.

See you all next year!

8 Comments on Atlanta Pen Show: Day Three

  1. So happy you had such a great experience, Ana! Your reports were so much fun to read- tthank you for letting some of us participate vicariously!

  2. So glad you had a fab time. When listening to the podcast Sat. I was so happy you all got to meet and hearing the true happiness made me so happy, and it was the best kickstarter I ever joined. Hope I can come down next year!!

    • I bought a secondhand Pelikan M200 with an italic nib that I had tweaked to lay a better line for my lefthandedness. Masuyama just smoothed it out a bit for me. I also had him fine tune a Franklin-Christoph EF nib for me which felt a little rough. They were both minor tweaks but were also my first adventures into custom nib tuning. I’ll go into more detail when I review these pens.

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