From The Archive: Retro 51 Tornado Mini Crossword Pencil

Mini Retro 51 crossword pencil

The Retro 51 Tornado Mini Crossword pencil is a 1.15mm pencil lead twist in a miniature version of the larger classic pencil.

As a crossword puzzle (and other paper puzzles) enthusiast, I received this pencil as a gift so I am not sure how expensive it was originally and I was unable to find a price for this particular model but plain Retro 51 mini pencils pop up on Amazon for around $20.

Mini Retro 51 pencil size comparison

Compared to a full-sized Retro 51, the mini is tiny! Even the Kaweco Sport and Liliput look large next to it. That said, this is not a pencil I would use for long writing sessions because the clip did end up digging into my hand. However, for twiddling while filling in a crossword puzzle at lunch or jotting quick notes like a phone number or grocery list, it’s totally fine for me. But its just at 3.5″ long — without the eraser which I lost sometime ago.

Mini Retro 51 crossword pencil writing sample

The thick lead is surprisingly easy to write with and its added width makes it unliekly to break easily.  Because of its small size, it often gets tucked into a pocket in my purse so I always have a pencil with me should the need arise.

I like using this pencil enough to strongly consider getting a full-sized Retro 51 Tornado pencil. I could even get a matching Crossword pencil in the full sized model for $33 (Also available in Sudoku or Stealth Black).

Rhodia 80th Anniversary Set

Rhodia 80th Anniversary Set

The Rhodia 80th Anniversary Limited Edition Set is finally available for purchase at $10 per set. The set includes a No. 80 sized tablet with a black cover and special Rhodia logo cover design and a black Rhodia pencil with matching pattern printed on it. the whole set comes in a special orange gift box.

Details:
Graph paper with faint grey grid
90 gsm, acid-free ivory paper
140 Pages (70 sheets)
6 x 8 ¼” (14.8 x 21 cm)

Rhodia 80th Anniversary Set

I don’t have any of the Rhodia paper in ivory with the grey grid so I might buy it for that though I’d hate to break up the perfect collector set. How about you?

(via European Paper)

LWA Fountain Pen Laboratory

LWA Fountain Pen Workshop

The Letter Writers Alliance is hosting a Fountain Pen Lab next Saturday in Chicago at the amazing Greer Stationery Shop. The lab is limited to 6 people and the lab fee includes a Kaweco sport demonstrator pen with a medium nib as well as all their experiences and knowledge about using fountain pens and improving penmanship.

Fountain Pen Laboratory
Saturday, Oct. 11th from 1-3pm
Location: Greer, 1657 N Wells St, Chicago, IL
Fee: $75

Go to the Letter Writers Alliance blog to register.

Fashionable Friday: Gold Heist

Since I’m traveling this week, I didn’t have a lot of time to pull together a Fashionable Friday. But never fear, the internet came to my rescue with this wonderful assortment of gold accoutrements for your office.

Bright & Beautiful Blog's gold office accessories

Items shown in photo tape dispenser || stapler || paper clips || mug || striped notebook || cards || clipboard || starburst || embosser || scissors || ‘Hustle’ print || tray || lamp || candle || iPhone case || (curated by Bright & Beautiful Blog)

Thanks to the Bright & Beautiful Blog for unknowingly doing my job for me this week. I’ll be back next week with my own take on fashion for the office. Until then… Enjoy!

Link Love: Loving the “Other” Stuff

Link Love Link MascotThis week’s links of the week are all those “Other Neat Stuff” links at the bottom. Two pen shows, the Pennaquod update, “The Pen Debacle” and Harry Marks’ “I Wrote a Novel” article are all excellent reads. I hope you enjoy them too.

Pens:

Ink:

Pencils:

Paper & Notebooks:

Other Neat Stuff:

Kickstarter: Office Putty

I really like the idea of having office “toys”. When I was a manager, I would often cover conference room tables with Silly Putty eggs and jars full of Lego. I find it helps people forget they are in a big room feeling awkward. It can give people something to do with their hand besides check their phones for messages and I’d like to believe that doing something tactile can get you thinking more clearly.

So, I was intrigued by the idea of Office Putty. It’s targeted for the office — in a respectable tin in a pleasing blue color and in a good sized wad.

However, I think the $20US/$22CAD opening price point seems a bit steep for the product. Normally, Kickstarter prices are a bit lower than the final retail prices and this seems like a high price, even at retail.

I really want to support this project but it seems a bit too expensive for what it is. Is it just me? Is $20 for a big tin of putty resonable? Talk me into it.

From The Archives: Pilot Precise V5

Pilot Precise V5

For the most part, rollerballs and I do not get along. Ink takes too long to dry or they skip or just don’t write at all. So, when I found my first Pilot Precise V5, it was true love. I hoarded them whenever I could find them. Now, they are readily available at every big box store, office supply shop or even your corner drugstore.

Pilot Precise V5 writing sample

When I discovered fountain pens and Japanese gel pens, I sort of forgot about the Precise V5. I think its time to re-embrace the Precise V5.

Its a simple cylindrical body pen with a silver clip on the lid. There’s no fancy silicone grip and no retractability. Just above the tip are some fins that remind me of fountain pen breather fins. The Precise V5 has a large ink reservoir and a clear window on the body of the pen to see how much ink is left.

On cheaper paper, the needle tip point tends to snag paper fibers and cause the tip to get a little gunky. A quick wipe on a piece of scrap paper or paper towel will clear up a gunky tip.

The Precise V5 is one of my Top 5 easily accessible pens. If you’re lucky, you might find the multi-pack that includes the pink, purple and turquoise ink versions. I love those!

Pilot Precise V5 tip

Stationery Shop Map

Winner: Marvy LePen Pen Set

Full set of Le Pens

Thanks to Jet Pens for providing the 18-piece set of Marvy Le Pens to give away for the From The Archives: Mary Le Pen review.

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The winner is:

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Congrats, Mary Ann! I’ll be contacting you by email to make arrangements for shipping. Thanks to everyone who left comments.

As for the color popularity: purples, orange and teal/oriental blues were very popular with readers. Shout-outs to grey and black as tried-and-true. There was even some love for the greens and the pinks. Marvy, your Le Pens are marvelous, every single color.

 

Japanese Pencil Comparison: Mitsubishi and Tombow

Japanese pencil comparison: Mitsubishi, Hi-Uni and Tombow

I recently purchased several of the more popular Japanese wood-cased pencils from Jet Pens. I got the Tombow 2558 ($1 each) and three Misubishis: the 9800 ($0.70 each), the Hi-Uni ($2.35 each) and the 9850 ($1 each). All of the pencils are the standard HB/#2 hardness.

Japanese pencils end caps

As far as I can tell, the only difference between the Mistubishi 9800 and 9850 is the color and the 9850 has an eraser top while the 9800 has an unfinished end.

Japanese pencil comparison points

This means that the Tombow 2558 and the Mistubishi 9850 are basically a head-to-head comparison with the same price point, metal ferrule and eraser top. The 9850 is finished in a burgundy, deep red lacquer and stamped in silver with coordinating silver ferrule and white eraser. On one side it is stamped “For Office Use”. The Tombow 2558 is painted in a bright yellow gold, comparable to classic American Ticonderogas. The ferrule is a bronze color rather than silver but it is topped with a classic pink rubber eraser. The 2558 is stamped on “For General Writing”.

Despite the fact that the Mitsubishi 9800 and 9850 should essentially be the same pencil at the core, the 9850 seemed smoother on paper than the 9800. Maybe it was just my perception. I like the looks and I do like pencils without eraser caps because I almost never use them.

Japanese pencil comparison writing sample

All four pencils wrote really well. They performed light years better than the cheap, no-name pencils found at drugstores or big box stores. When compared to each other though, I found the Mitsubishi 9850 to be my favorite. It just wrote silky smooth, the finish on the pencil was good and it looked good. The Tombow 2558 was an equally good performer and had the classic yellow pencil looks to recommend it. These two performed so similarly it was hard to say if one was better than the other beyond a preference for red over yellow pencils.

I was least impressed with the Hi-Uni if only that it performed quite similarly to the other three pencils but at twice the price. I realize I’m splitting hairs when comparing $1 versus $2.35 pencils. Yes, the lacquer finish is smoother and the end is dipped in black for a smooth cap. There are other design details in the finishing of the Hi-Uni like the white dot, gold foil ring and extra glossy finish, but in actual writing performance, the Hi-Uni was quite similar to the other pencils though maybe a little bit harder and therefore a little lighter on paper.

Japanese pencil comparison writing sample

I forgot to test the erasers but since only two of the four have erasers it is an unfair comparison, right? Besides, I use a hand eraser like a Black Pearl or a Staedtler Mars anyway.

All-in-all, the Japanese sure know how to make good pencils. There really isn’t a dud in this bunch but rather just personal preferences. They all sharpened easily and cleanly with my Lefty hand sharpener and retained their points well (the photos were taken after doing the writing tests).


DISCLAIMER: This item was sent to me free of charge by Jet Pens for the purpose of review. Please see the About page for more details.

Out of Print Library Card Pouch

Library Card Pouch

The Out of Print Yellow Library Card Pouch was a little gem I spied on Amazon for $14.99. I stuck it on my wishlist as a reminder to order it later. Well, my darling husband spied it there and bought it for me.

It’s about 6×9″ in size, perfect as a carryall for pens, pencils, and related tools. Its made of bright yellow canvas, printed with blue library card lines and has a matching blue zipper.

Library Card Pouch filled

I tossed all my regular “daily carry” tools into with plenty of room to spare for some washi tape, glue stick and other items I might add for letter writing on the road. The canvas isn’t lined or heavyweight so its not as sturdy as my usual LWA member pouch. I love the look and the bright color but it isn’t sturdy enough to usurp the LWA pouch as my EDC. I might use the Library Card Pouch when traveling or to carry my knitting tools. Either way, I might pull out my embroidery tools and embellish it with some embroidered text. What book might it be and who else checked it out?

Book: Letters To My Future Self

Letters To My Future Self Cover

Letters to My Future Self ($14.95 MSRP) is a marvelously designed little book that contains self-sealing letters and prompts to write letters to yourself. The book was designed by Lea Redmond best know for the World’s Smallest Post Service Kit.

Letters To My Future Self Inner Page

The letters fold up and include designed stamps, labels and wonderful air mail patterns.

Letters To My Future Self Folded Envelope

On the back of each page is the prompt for the letter and a place to add the date your wrote it and the date it should be opened again.

Letters To My Future Self Unfolded Letter/Envelope

When you unfold the page, there is a full sheet of paper to write your letter to yourself. They remind me of Postalettes or the WWII V-Mail. I haven’t tried writing on the paper but it feels like a good quality 80lb text weight or so. This paper will probably withstand a fine-nibbed fountain pen or any good quality gel, rollerball, or ballpoint. Pencil would be good too.

Letters To My Future Self Sticker Sheet

In the back of the book are stickers for sealing the envelopes.

Letters To My Future Self Back Cover

The book includes a dozen letters to write and the hard cover string-bound spine gives a nice look to the whole package. There is also a Letters to My Baby book and several journals for grandchildren, neices and nephews all under the category of “Paper Time Capsule“.

I think the whole collection is incredibly well done and a great way to inspire me to write some goals and some “how I feel now” to refer to sometime later. If you’re not inclined to maintain  a full-fledged journal, this may be a great way to take a letter per week or, since there’s twelve, a letter per month, and get some words on paper.


DISCLAIMER: This item was sent to me free of charge by Leafcutter Designs for the purpose of review. Please see the About page for more details.

Fashionable Friday: In the Navy

in-the-navy

I never thought I’d develop a fondness for navy. I was always inclined to favor black or grey but navy looks good with bright pops of color and easily as warm, rich browns. It can be nautical or French with hits of red and stripes, or thoroughly modern with a warm pink. Mixed with Kelly green, it’s totally preppy. And it looks fabulous with lime (I’m just sayin’). I was inspired by this librarian chic ensemble and imagined the best office accessories to compliment it.

  • Letts of London Noteletts Large Yellow Ruled Notebook $14.95 (via Pen Boutique)
  • Kaweco Sport Yellow Cab Fountain Pen £16,95 (via Fontoplumo)*
  • If I Do Say So Myself Large Notebook $24 (via Kate Spade)
  • White + Navy West 18th 3-Drawer File Cabinet $199 (via Poppin)
  • A.G. Spalding & Bros Hexagonal Body Ballpoint Pen in Navy $16.50 (via Jet Pens)
  • Sun-Star Stickyle Pen-Style Scissors in Navy Blue $8.25 (via Jet Pens)
  • Diamine Sargasso Sea Ink $12.95 (via Goulet Pens)
  • Private Reserve Buttercup Ink $11 (via Goulet Pens)
  • KUM Magnesium 2 Hole Pencil Sharpener $3.50 (via European Paper)
  • Dixon Ticonderoga, box of 12 pre-sharpened $3.17 (via Dick Blick)
  • Navy Tape Dispenser $12 (via Poppin)

(Outfit from Boden)

* Argh! I hung this whole post on the gorgeous, yellow cab Kaweco Sport which is no longer available. I recommend the Kaweco Art Sport in Amecitrin £89,50, if you’re in the market for a bright yellow pocket fountain pen.

Link Love: Hobby or Obssession?

rp_link-ana.jpgPost of the Week:
This is the follow-up to the post last week and continues to consider and evaluate pen purchasing for fun, profit and completeness (one of everything from a series).
Liking Pens Part II: Can Pens Be An Investment? (via Clicky Post)

Pens:

Inks:

Pencils:

Paper & Notebooks:

Other great stuff:

-1And finally,
Pen Chalet is hosting a giveaway on Sheaffer commemorative items including a silver Sheaffer coin and the book 100 years of Sheaffer. There are three copies of the book available and the grand prize winner will also receive the commemorative coin. Lots of ways to enter too

Erasable Podcast Sticker

Erasable podcast sticker

Do you have your Erasable podcast sticker proudly displayed? I do.Thanks to Andy for sending me a couple before they sold out. If you want one, put in a request, I’m sure they’ll do a reprint soon.

I guess it’s about time that I made some Well-Appointed Desk stickers. Would anyone be interested?

From The Archives: Marvy LePen

Marvy Le Pen Array

from-the-archives

Over the last four years of writing The Well-Appointed Desk, I’ve mentioned my propensity for Mary Le Pens but I realized I’ve never actually published a review. I initially discovered Le Pen in my pre-teens and it may be THE PEN that lead me to where I am today. Before finding LePens, I had only known black, blue or red ballpoints and the occasional rollerballs. Le Pens opened my eyes to good quality “felt tip” pens in a wide array of colors at a price I could afford on a teenager’s allowance. By the time I graduated from college, I found it harder to find Le Pens and I assumed they had faded from the world like so many other things. Then a couple years ago, I stumbled across them in my local art supply store and I bought just about every color that was available.

Marvy Le Pen writing sample

Ergonomically, they isn’t much to recommend them. Encased in a slim, straight, plastic cylinder with a snap cap and a simple silver clip that can easily be bent out of shape, and a nylon/fiber tip point that wears down over time, they are not in the same league as many pens I’ve reviewed over the years. But with a retail price of $1.15, these 0.3mm, acid-free, smudge-proof markers are some of my favorite pens. There are more than a dozen colors available and my favorites are the deeper, more complex colors like the gray, orchid, olive and teal. A full set of all 18 colors is available on Jet Pens.

Full set of Le Pens

Giveaway: To share my love and devotion for LePens, I’d like to give one lucky reader a full set of 18 Le Pens, compliments of Jet Pens. Just leave a note in the comments and tell me which color is (or could be) your favorite Le Pen to be officially entered.


FINE PRINT: All entries must be submitted by 10pm CST on Sunday, September 28, 2014. All entries must be submitted at wellappointeddesk.com, not Twitter, Tumblr or Facebook, okay? Winner will be announced on Monday. Winner will be selected by random number generator from entries that played by the rules (see above). Please include your email address in the comment form so that I can contact you if you win. I will not save email addresses or sell them to anyone — pinky swear. If winner does not respond within 30 days, I will draw a new giveaway winner. US readers only this time, thanks!

Beyond The Halfway Point: Hobonichi Techo Planner 2014

When I got my Hobonichi Techo at the end of last year, I was dedicatedly using it. But somewhere around the end of May, I lost steam. I just sort of stopped using it. I don’t know if work got slow, or crazy or monotonous but I just stopped writing in it. And I had been using my Hobonichi for more than just meeting notes. I would write what we ate for dinner, if we watched a movie, what days I exercised and so on. So, there really wasn’t any reason to stop.

My Hobonichi Techo Planner 2014

A few months after I got my Hobonichi planner and cover, I decided I needed to personalize it. The cover was already a distinctly TARDIS blue so the solution seemed obvious. I found some artwork online, resized it in Photoshop. I printed it out, trimmed it to size and then slid the artwork underneath the plastic sleeves. No adhesives were used so the cover was not damaged in my customizing. If I ever feel like removing the TARDIS art, it would just mean removing the plastic covers and pulling the art out. Easy Peasy.

At the beginning of September I picked it back up. Luckily, the Hobonichi did not try to shame me for the missed months. I just opened to the current day and started writing again. Its still a great notebook. Its an easy size to use — not too big, not too small.  The paper is good for fountain pens though I find some inks take to long to dry and I end up closing the book too soon and smearing the ink on the facing page.

My Hobonichi Techo Planner 2014 top view

The plastic protective cover and the fabric cover have all protected the planner beautifully.

My Hobonichi Techo Planner 2014 side view

Even the pen loops show minimal wear even though they see the most abuse. My TWSBI Mini fits comfortably in the loops and the Pilot Iroshizuku Ku-Jaku coordinates nicely though I often jot notes with whatever colored pen or pencil I have in my hand at the moment.

My Hobonichi Techo Planner 2014 inside front cover

I haven’t collected too much detritus in the front pockets.

My Hobonichi Techo Planner 2014 inside

I’ve been inspired by Patrick Rhone’s mini doodles so I’ve been trying to add my own versions. I’ve also started dividing my pages vertically. Meetings or activities on the left and lists of to-do’s on the right.

My Hobonichi Techo Planner 2014 inside back cover

Someone brought back some classic Japanese planner stickers for me which I’ve tried to add to my planner here and there. I’m saving the fuzzy alpaca for a big knitting-related day.

My Hobonichi Techo Planner 2014 back cover

Yup, TARDIS on the back too. Though it looks like the back cover TARDIS sheet is slipping a little.

My Hobonichi is definitely bigger on the inside.

Koh-i-noor Magic Erasers

koh-i-noor magic erasers

Are these not the most amazing looking erasers? These are Koh-inoor Magic erasers available from a seller on Ebay. They are almost too pretty to actually use but use them I did and I was pleased at how well they actually worked. They are not as good as the white plastic Staedtler Mars erasers that are my go-to but the rainbow colors will surely brighten my day.

Koh-i-noor Magic Eraser test

Pencil Tourism: Crystal Bridges Edition

Crystal Bridges Museum Paintbrush Pencil

My husband drove down to Bentonville, AR to visit the Crystal Bridges Museum and meet up with his parents. The museum focuses on American art and was founded by ALice Walton, daughter of Sam Walton, founder of the Wal-Mart empire. The museum is actually pretty amazing. It sits on 120 acres with lots of nature trails as well as the museum which is housed in a building designed by Moshe Safdie. Not at all what you’d expect to find in Arkansas, is it?

Crystal Bridges Museum Paintbrush Pencil

So, how does this relate to the blog? Because I acquired a unique pencil for my Pencil Tourism collection. Its a paintbrush mounted onto a round pencil. So I can sharpen the other end and have a paint brush and a pencil. Pretty cool, huh?

Crystal Bridges Museum Paintbrush Pencil

Review: Lokta Paper Goods by Monk Papers

Lokta paper is made from the fibrous inner bark of the high-elevation evergreen bushes in the Himalayans. This paper is often just called Nepali paper. Pen Boutique has started carrying a wide variety of lokta-based paper good from a company called Monk Papers including journals, notebooks, and stationery sets.

Monk Paper Computer Paper

I received a packet of deep violet printer paper cut to 8.5×11 to fit into US printers and copiers, an A5-sized hardcover journal and a boxed photo album.

The cut sheets are a deep vivid purple. I thought the dark color of the purple screamed for an opaque white gel pen and it looks fantastic.

Monk Paper printer sheets letter size

One side of the paper is smoother than the other and probably better suited to holding ink jet inks than the more textured side. Unfortunately the purple paper is too dark to be legible but I think other colors would work well and be great for invites, resumes or a typed letter.

Monk Papers Photo Album

I was also sent this festive photo album and matching storage box. Its about 8″x8″ in size. The dots are colored dots of paper attached to the cover. I think this is one of the best uses for this paper. It looks fabulous, durable and totally unique.

Monk Papers Hardcover Journal

I was also sent an A5 hard cover journal. The cover is the same color as the interior pages and the spine is covered in a contrasting colored paper . The binding is a traditional stitched binding that lays flat easily.

Monk Paper Journal writing sample Monk Paper Journal writing sample Monk Paper Journal writing sample Monk Paper Journal writing sample close-up

I experimented with a lot of different tools with this paper because my standard habit of using super-fine pens just did not work on this paper. The super-fine gel pens and fountain pens stabbed into the soft, fibrous paper. Brushes, pencils and wider rollerballs and art tools work best on this paper. There doesn’t appear to be any sizing on the paper so wet tools like brush pens and watercolor absorb quickly. I think heavy water coverage would warp the paper pretty severely.

Monk Paper Journal reverse of stock

From the reverse of the page, there’s some bleed and show-through as I would suspect from such a soft paper.

The Lokta paper is unusual enough that I think everyone should have a chance to try it but it is like other specialty papers, not all the tools you normally use will work but other things might.


DISCLAIMER: This item was sent to me free of charge by Pen Boutique for the purpose of review. Please see the About page for more details.

Ask The Desk: A Fine-Tipped Refill for a Hex-o-Matic

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I have a Retro Hex-o-matic and looking for a refill with a fine point. Looking for something like the Schimdt easyflow 9000 but in fine point. What would you recommend?

Since the Retro 51 Hex-o-Matic ballpoint takes a standard sized Parker-style refill, you have a lot of options. According to the Epic Refill Guide, there are lots of options but since you are specifically looking for a fine point refill, let’s see what I can find…

Screen Shot 2014-09-20 at 4.09.20 PM

Fisher Space Ballpoint Refills are available in a fine point. Monteverde makes a soft-roll needle point refill and a “capless” fine point gel refill. Schmidt makes the P900 fine point ballpoint refill. Visconti offers a gel refill in fine as well.

I’m sure I overlooked a gem or two from the Epic Refill Guide but these should get you started. Check you local big box office supply store as they may carry Monteverde as well as other possible options or search Amazon.

Happy writing!

For a review of the Hex-O-Matic ballpoint, check out The Clicky Post.

(Image from Pen Boutique)

Fashionable Friday: Breakfast at Tiffany’s Inspired

Fashionable Friday: Breakfast at Tiffany's

I don’t know why but, this week, I got “Moon River” stuck in my head and it always reminds me of the film that made it famous, Breakfast at Tiffany’s. So, that is the inspiration for this week’s Fashionable Friday.

Audrey Hepburn’s portrayal of Holly Golightly is ingrained in my mind so clearly. The gorgeous dresses and the kooky eyelash eye mask. And, of course, I could not forget Cat, her faithful companion.

You will have to acquire you own coffee and sticky bun.

  • China Glaze For Audrey Polish $7.50 (via Ulta)
  • Pilot Prera in Soft Blue $49.50 (via Jet Pens)
  • Filofax Classic Personal Organizer Personal $103.50 (via Pen Boutique)
  • Pelikan Souveran 320 Fountain Pen in Pearl $484 (via Pen Chalet)
  • J. Herbin Diabolo Menthe $10 (via Goulet Pens)
  • Pilot Stargazer Fountain Pen – Pearl White, 14k Fine $152 (via Goulet Pens)
  • Exacompta Club Leatherette Refillable Journal (via Jet Pens)
  • Baker’s Jar $24 (via Anthropologie)
  • Parisienne Pencil Case (via Anthropologie)
  • Feline Finery Necklace $14.99 (via Modcloth)

Review: Pelikan Edelstein Ruby Cartridges

Pelikan Edelstein Ruby tin

I’d been very interested in getting some of the Pelikan Edelstein ink cartridges. They come in a lovely tin and I like having a pack of cartridges at work so that, in a pinch, I can quickly refill a pen without making a big mess.  The tin means I could keep it in my daily kit so I have cartridges handy all the time. I bought the Ruby color from my local pen shop.

Pelikan Edelstein Ruby cartridges

What I didn’t realize is that the Pelikan Edelstein cartridges are European LONG cartridges. Most of my pens, that take standard European cartridges, are not big enough for the long cartridges. I finally found one pen that could accommodate the longer cartridges, my Kaweco Student.

Pelikan Edelstein Ruby ink

Inked and ready to go, I was finally able to test PE Ruby. Its a pinky-red color with some nice shading, even with the extra-fine nib in my Kaweco Student. Its a bit lighter color than I had expected.  A Google image search for “ruby gem” reveals that rubies are a bit pinky in color when light shines through them so the name is appropriate for the color. Just, in my head, I always thought of rubies as a darker red.

Edelstein inks are good quality and flow smoothly and feel lubricated which helps validate the steeper price point.

Pelikan Edelstein Ruby ink writing samples

When compared to other reds in my stash, it does fill a gap. Diamine Wild Strawberry is a bit more orangey, and Noodler’s Mandalay Maroon is darker and probably more what my head thought of as “ruby”.

Six LONG European-style cartridges are available in each tin for $7.95 from Goulet Pens since my local pen shop does not list them on their online shop. If you’re in KC though, stop by The Pen Place in Crown Center and pick them up in person.

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